Breathing for Wrestling – Part Two

A few weeks ago we ran a workshop on breathing for wrestling, because breathing is like, super important and useful when you’re being squashed. During the research phase we realized there’s not much information on the internet about developing good breathing skills specifically for ground fighting, so we thought we’d do our bit to contribute to the World Wide Web’s great knowledge repository.

Part Two is all about strengthening and control exercises.

Control Exercises

  1. Take a 2 inch square of paper and place it on a wall. Try to keep it on the wall just by blowing on it.
  2. Take a full, deep breath. Sing, play a recorder/whistle/kazoo, hum, or hiss and hold the note as long as you can keep it steady. Maintain the same tone and volume. When it’s about to start wavering relax, inhale, and start again.
  3. Take a full, deep breath. Sing, play a recorder/whistle/kazoo, hum, or hiss and hold the note as long as you can keep it steady. Start quiet, get loud, and go back to quiet over the course of the single breath. Keep the note steady. When it’s about to start wavering relax, inhale, and start again.
  4. Take a full, deep breath. Sing, play a recorder/whistle/kazoo, hum, or hiss and hold the note as long as you can keep it steady. Start quiet, get loud, and go back to quiet over the course of the single breath. If you’re singing, cycle through different vowel sounds. If you’re hissing or playing a whistle, move your face around in different shapes. Keep the note steady. When it’s about to start wavering relax, inhale, and start again.
  5. Take a full, deep breath. Sing, play a recorder/whistle/kazoo, hum, or hiss and hold the note as long as you can keep it steady. Maintain the same tone and volume. When it’s about to start wavering relax, inhale a quick, full breath, and start the note again.
  6. Snatch breaths. Find a song with a moderate beat that you can count to. Mix it up with different tempos if you get bored, but maintain the ratio of 4 in, 8 out.
    1. ‘1’ – breathe in (¼ full)
    2. ‘2’ – (½ full)
    3. ‘3’ – (¾ full)
    4. ‘4’ – (full)
    5. 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 – breathe out, gradually.
  7. Take a slow, deep breath in. Strong, quick, full exhale. Repeat.
  8. Stand facing a wall, a couple of inches away. Say “HA.” Do it again. Try and bounce the sound off the wall so it comes back to you. Once you’ve got the hang of it, move back. Keep bouncing the sound off the wall, until the wall is far away and the sound is loud. If you’re a singer, want to save your voice, or just feel like a change, use “GA” instead – it puts the initial stress and pressure against your tongue instead of your vocal chords.

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